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2014 Standings
After Long Beach
Pos. Driver Points

1 Will Power 93
2 Mike Conway 66
3 Simon Pagenaud 60
4 Helio Castroneves 55
5 Ryan Hunter-Reay 54
6 Scott Dixon 51
7 Carlos Munoz 48
8 Juan Pablo Montoya 47
9 Mikhail Aleshin 46
10 Sebastian Saavedra 42
11 Tony Kanaan 40
12 Justin Wilson 38
13 Takuma Sato 36
14 Josef Newgarden 34
15 Ryan Briscoe 33
16 Sebastien Bourdais 33
17 Graham Rahal 33
18 Marco Andretti 32
19 Carlos Huertas 32
20 Oriol Servia 26
21 Jack Hawksworth 24
22 James Hinchcliffe 20
23 Charlie Kimball 17

Wins
T1 Will Power 1
T1 Mike Conway 1

Podium Finishes
1 Will Power 2
T2 Ryan Hunter-Reay 1
T2 Helio Castroneves 1
T2 Mike Conway 1
T2 Carlos Munoz 1

Lap Leaders:
1 Will Power 74
2 Ryan Hunter-Reay 51
3 Takuma Sato 33
4 Scott Dixon 22
5 Mike Conway 4
6 Sebastian Saavedra 3
7 Helio Castroneves 2
8 Josef Newgarden 1


Prize Money
1 Will Power $50,000
T2 Mike Conway $30,000
T2 Ryan Hunter-Reay $30,000
4 Simon Pagenaud $18,000
5 Takuma Sato $17,000
T6 Helio Castroneves $15,000
T6 Carlos Munoz $15,000
T8 Juan Pablo Montoya $10,000
T8 Scott Dixon $10,000
T10 Mikhail Aleshin $8,000
T10 Tony Kanaan $8,000
12 Oriol Servia $7,000
T13 Justin Wilson $5,000
T13 Marco Andretti $5,000
T15 Sebastian Saavedra $4,000
T15 Josef Newgarden $4,000
T17 Ryan Briscoe $2,000
T17 Carlos Huertas $2,000

Entrant Points
Pos. # Entrant Points
1 12 Team Penske 93
2 20 Ed Carpenter Racing 66
3 77 Schmidt Peterson Motorsports 60
4 3 Team Penske 55
5 28 Andretti Autosport 54
6 9 Target Chip Ganassi Racing 51
7 34 Andretti Autosport – HVM Racing 48
8 2 Team Penske 47
9 7 Schmidt Peterson Motorsports 46
10 17 KV AFS Racing 42
11 10 Target Chip Ganassi Racing 40
12 19 Dale Coyne Racing 38
13 14 A.J. Foyt Enterprises 36
14 67 Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing 34
15 8 NTT Data Chip Ganassi Racing 33
16 11 KVSH Racing 33
17 15 Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing 33
18 25 Andretti Autosport 32
19 18 Dale Coyne Racing 32
20 16 Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing 26
21 98 BHA/BBM with Curb-Agajanian 24
22 27 Andretti Autosport 20
23 83 Novo Nordisk Chip Ganassi Racing 17

Finishing Average
1 Will Power 1.5
2 Simon Pagenaud 5
T3 Helio Castroneves 7
T3 Oriol Servia 7
5 Scott Dixon 8
6 Mike Conway 8.5
7 Mikhail Aleshin 9
8 Juan Pablo Montoya 9.5
T9 Sebastian Saavedra 10
T9 Carlos Munoz 10
11 Ryan Hunter-Reay 11
T12 Tony Kanaan 12
T12 Justin Wilson 12
T14 Ryan Briscoe 13.5
T14 Sebastien Bourdais 13.5
T14 Graham Rahal 13.5
T17 Josef Newgarden 14
T17 Carlos Huertas 14
19 Takuma Sato 14.5
20 Marco Andretti 15
21 Jack Hawksworth 18
22 James Hinchcliffe 20
23 Charlie Kimball 21.5

Pole Positions
T1 Takuma Sato 1
T1 Ryan Hunter-Reay 1

Appearances in the Firestone Fast Six
1 Ryan Hunter-Reay 2
T2 Scott Dixon 1
T2 Tony Kanaan 1
T2 Sebastien Bourdais 1
T2 Will Power 1
T2 Takuma Sato 1
T2 Marco Andretti 1
T2 James Hinchcliffe 1
T2 Josef Newgarden 1
T2 Simon Pagenaud 1
T2 Jack Hawksworth 1

Qualifying Average
1 Ryan Hunter-Reay 2
2 Scott Dixon 6
3 Jack Hawksworth 6.5
4 Marco Andretti 7
5 Tony Kanaan 7.5
T6 Takuma Sato 8
T6 Sebastien Bourdais 8
T8 Will Power 9
T8 Carlos Munoz 9
10 Helio Castroneves 9.5
11 Simon Pagenaud 10
12 James Hinchcliffe 10.5
13 Oriol Servia 12
T14 Josef Newgarden 13
T14 Justin Wilson 13
16 Ryan Briscoe 13.5
17 Mike Conway 14.5
18 Sebastian Saavedra 16.5
19 Juan Pablo Montoya 17
20 Mikhail Aleshin 17.5
21 Carlos Huertas 19
22 Charlie Kimball 19.5
23 Graham Rahal 22
Tony George getting used to new role

by Tony George on the Vision Racing website
Sunday, July 26, 2009

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Tony George
After having a week off from racing I have had a chance to relax and reflect on the events that have taken place over the last few weeks.  I have decided to use the Vision Racing website, in a therapeutic way, to help clear my mind and clear the air by sharing some of my thoughts:

Settling into a different routine after 20 years has been quite an adjustment.  I must say, it was neither something I was expecting nor something I had given much consideration to, but not unusual given the time in which we currently live.  All around me I see that people’s lives are being affected by the realities of a deepening recession, and we all hope it begins to turn around soon and that better days are what lie ahead.

I would be less than honest if I said that last February 2008, after we were able to unify open-wheel racing, I didn’t at least let the thought of possibly “dialing back the boost” a little bit slip into my mind.  However, I knew there would be a couple of more years of hard work ahead of us, as we had asked for and been given the opportunity to provide the leadership of the sport going forward.  Knowing that there would be reservations expressed by some in our ability to lead, I had confidence that the right team of people had been assembled to take it forward.

Knowing that the decision made would be good for all concerned, we set out to do the nearly impossible and to bring about an immediate transition.  It came at great expense and would not have been possible without the support from some great partners, but the majority of the heavy-lifting would be borne by our company. I knew that the historic start to the 2008 season would be rocky, but felt that by May things would start to sort out and the series would start to come together as one. That proved to be the case. 

Most, if not all, of the early concerns expressed began to subside; many who had expressed their concerns began to provide positive reinforcement for the job that had been done bringing it together under challenging conditions. 

Little did we know just how challenging it was going to become. The second half of the season rolled along while most started to look toward 2009 and the promise that, together, we could now really start to capitalize on the momentum we had been gaining all season long.  Higher gas prices were starting to have an affect on race attendance, mainly at NASCAR events, as people were beginning to have to make choices between discretionary spending and providing for their basic needs.  But IndyCar fans were still turning out in support of a unified series. 

By the end of the season it started to become clear that our hopes of catching a tailwind from unification heading into 2009 would be met with more challenges.  We were now going to have even stiffer headwinds brought about by the global market and financial crisis.  By late fall the rumblings began that teams were going to be expecting financial support from the League if they were going to be able to compete in 2009.

Now, I don’t think it is a secret that most IndyCar and Champ Car teams have relied heavily on financial support from series owners to fund or subsidize their operations over the last 5 years.  In fact, I know that in the case of the IRL, every team that has ever competed in the series, since inception, has received support to some degree.  Given those facts, it is a testament to the commitment of the teams and sponsors in the series today that they have persevered this season without any subsidy from the League. 

Important to note in all of this is, contrary to popular belief, our family does not have an endless supply of cash to continue to pour into the League in the form of subsidy.  Rather, it is incumbent on the league to provide the leadership expected during this challenging economic time to grow the business, to grow the sport, and to position it for success in the future.

A good plan to start the year had been developed, but not before executive management had sufficiently challenged the business group leaders to re-examine their own budget planning process and goals for 2009.  I had to convince my colleagues that the only way we could develop a comprehensive enterprise plan would be to have regular, frequent and transparent management meetings so each unit could see and understand the big picture.  This is something that was going to require time, given how we had previously operated. 

Anyone who has any aptitude at all for running a business would realize that the task of creating and following through with a successful long-term plan is something that takes a great deal of time and patience.  While the plan has been put into motion, and positive growth is evident, it will require much more time and effort to fully see the plan through. This is a process that I had been committed to being a part of, even though others had different ideas of their own.   

That being said, I continue to be perplexed by the board’s recent decision to relieve me from my responsibility as CEO of the enterprise.  To date, I have not received a reasonable explanation as to why; the statement they released to the press not withstanding, I feel as though after 20 years I am entitled to one.  I understand that maybe they don’t feel that they owe me an explanation.

One thing I can tell you is that I stood resolute in my conviction on the direction we needed to go and that the measures we have taken since January are only a beginning. A complete review of how we are structured and operate is necessary.  Beyond my being dismissed, I am unaware of any changes that are being contemplated that will have a meaningful impact on the organization. 

I have been replaced in my role as manager by two individuals who have been with the company for many years.  In that time they have also been members of the executive management team and have participated in all of the strategic decisions that have been made over the last 15 years, so they are well aware of the challenges ahead.  My question for the board has been not one of who is going to manage the company, but rather, who is going to lead it?  There is a distinction.

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