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USCC Point Standings
Final 2016
Prototype Drivers
Pos Drivers Total
1 Dane Cameron 314
1 Eric Curran 314
2 Joao Barbosa 311
2 Christian Fittipaldi 311
3 Jordan Taylor 309
3 Ricky Taylor 309
4 Oswaldo Negri Jr. 282
5 Marc Goossens 273
6 Tom Long 258
6 Joel Miller 258
7 Tristan Nunez 257
7 Jonathan Bomarito 257
8 John Pew 255
9 Ryan Dalziel 247
10 Katherine Legge 247
11 Sean Rayhall 196
12 Scott Sharp 128
12 Johannes van Overbeek 128
12 Luis Felipe Derani 128
13 Olivier Pla 113
14 Max Angelelli 113
15 Ryan Hunter-Reay 109
16 Spencer Pigot 95
17 Andy Meyrick 91
18 Filipe Albuquerque 88
19 Ed Brown 72
20 Ben Devlin 70
21 Scott Pruett 62
22 Simon Pagenaud 55
23 Rubens Barrichello 53
24 Nicolas Minassian 52
25 Byron DeFoor 46
25 Jim Pace 46
25 David Hinton 46
25 Dorsey Schroeder 46
26 Henrik Hedman 29
26 Nicolas Lapierre 29
27 Brendon Hartley 27
27 Andy Priaulx 27
27 Lance Stroll 27
27 Alex Wurz 27
28 Jonny Adam 26
29 Jamie McMurray 25
29 Scott Dixon 25
29 Tony Kanaan 25
29 Kyle Larson 25
30 Gabby Chaves 25
31 Thomas Gruber 24
32 Keiko Ihara 24
33 Maurizio Mediani 23
33 Kirill Ladygin 23
33 Mikhail Aleshin 23
34 AJ Allmendinger 21
35 Carlos de Quesada 21
35 Dominik Farnbacher 21
35 Cameron Lawrence 21
35 Daniel Morad 21
36 Andreas Wirth 20

Prototype Teams
1 #31 ACTION EXPRESS RACING 314
2 #5 ACTION EXPRESS RACING 311
3 #10 WAYNE TAYLOR RACING 309
4 #60 MICHAEL SHANK RACING 282
5 #90 VISITFLORIDA RACING 273
6 #70 MAZDA MOTORSPORTS 258
7 #55 MAZDA MOTORSPORTS 257
8 #0 PANOZ DELTAWING RACING 220
9 #2 TEQUILA PATRON ESM 128
10 #50 HIGHWAY TO HELP 46
11 #81 DRAGONSPEED 29
12 #01 FORD CHIP GANASSI RACING 27
13 #02 FORD CHIP GANASSI RACING 25
14 #37 SMP RACING 23
15 #24 ALEGRA MOTORSPORTS 21

Prototype Manufacturers
1 Chevrolet 338
2 Ligier 324
3 Mazda 304
4 Oreca 56
5 BR 30
What it takes to be an ALMS Team Manager

ALMS
Wednesday, July 27, 2011

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The Audi team at LeMans
Battery Tender recently announced a "Mechanic of the Year" prize that will award five crew members with $5,000 each at the end of the season. But the awards don’t apply simply to "mechanics"; the award is available to any member of a race team in the American Le Mans Series presented by Tequila Patr¢n. This includes everyone from the tire changers to the truck driver to the engineers.

An ALMS team can have anywhere from 10-50 highly specialized members, often divided into the full-time crew and the "fly-in" (a.k.a. weekend) crew, and then further divided by car if there are multiple vehicles. Who do all these people look to for direction, approval and their boarding passes? The team manager.

Dyson Racing’s team manager, Michael White jokingly compares his job to that of a ringmaster.

"You have to be conscious of everything going on throughout the course of the day and what’s coming up in the days to come and try to keep the circus under the big top," he said.

A team manager makes sure the right people are assigned the right roles and that everyone has what they need to do their jobs. The race car, transporter and crew don’t make it to the track without the team manager’s schedule, budget and instructions. The team won’t even make it on the entry list without the right paperwork!

"From the start of the year you have to assemble a team," summarized Jaguar RSR`s John Gentilozzi. "You have to keep everyone on task and going in the right direction; you have to be sure that everything is prepared and you’ve ordered all your fuel and equipment; you have to keep in touch with the series and make sure your paperwork is all filled out; and then you get to the track and at any given time deal with what occurs.

"It’s a huge, huge job and it’s a very thankless position for sure," adds Gentilozzi. "You’re not going to make a change to the car that’s going to make it win or lose, but you certainly would have set the systems in place that allow you to perform."

Maybe that’s why Gentilozzi handed over the Team Manager reigns to Gary Penission this year. The job may come with a wealth of responsibility but as Penission explains, being involved in every aspect of the team’s operation makes the rewards that much greater.

"The best is being part of the team," said Penission, who’s worked in open-wheel and sports cars. "Being the guy that everyone looks to, to get information from. They lean on me for experience. I like looking back on how far I’ve come and now bringing up the younger kids. Teaching them how to get into racing and see where they go."

Speaking of how to get involved in racing, how does one become a team manager?

"Frankly, it’s something I fell into," explained White. "I started out in the industry. I had the opportunity to get involved on a club level and it snowballed from there. It was a weekend deal that turned into a part-time, paying deal that turned into a full-time deal."

Morgan Brady worked as a team manager in support series before making the move into ALMS this season with CORE autosport in LMPC.

"I have an engineering background," Brady said. "I have an Undergrad in mechanical engineering and a Master’s in engineering as well. I like to be involved on the engineering side."

A Master’s Degree in engineering doesn’t give Brady the leeway to pass on the less glamorous aspects of the job, like coordinating travel or filling in for missing team members, which many managers list as their least favorite tasks.

Corvette team manager Gary Pratt shares another of the less desirable projects on his list.

"Packing up after a long, hard weekend," Pratt said. "The worst part is if you crash the car and now you’re not taking things home in one piece."

Aside from packing up, race day is actually the least hectic day for the team manager. If he or she has done the job right, all that’s needed is a couple of morning meetings and then the day is in the hands of the drivers and crew. The offseason and time in between races is often when the really busy work is done.

"For testing, I’m working with the different tracks," Pratt said of the time spent between races. "That’s a big thing - knowing what’s going on as soon as you can because track days are gone in a hurry. I’m working with the sanctioning bodies, which has become more engineering driven, so a lot of the engineers help with that. There’s a lot of personnel, logistics, working with the ACO and IMSA and ALMS. In our case, we build our cars at the shop, so there’s a lot of coordination between the manufacturing side and the race team. That’s at home, where I spend a lot of time."

With so many things to keep on top of all season, a team manager seems more than worthy of the Battery Tender Mechanic of the Year Award. But, by nature, a team manager is reluctant to pick an MVP from their pack, let alone take credit for his or her own contributions.

"Everybody is important," Brady stated. "Whether it’s the guy that drives the truck to the track, because if he’s not there, we’re not going racing, or the guy that does the tires, because one mistake could cost us time. You’re only as strong as your weakest link. In our group everybody has a role and everybody is important."

It will be hard to select just five individuals, but those who earn the "Mechanic of the Year" title will be honored at the Night of Champions ceremony, following the 14th Annual Petit Le Mans powered by MAZDA.

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