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Final 2016
Prototype Drivers
Pos Drivers Total
1 Dane Cameron 314
1 Eric Curran 314
2 Joao Barbosa 311
2 Christian Fittipaldi 311
3 Jordan Taylor 309
3 Ricky Taylor 309
4 Oswaldo Negri Jr. 282
5 Marc Goossens 273
6 Tom Long 258
6 Joel Miller 258
7 Tristan Nunez 257
7 Jonathan Bomarito 257
8 John Pew 255
9 Ryan Dalziel 247
10 Katherine Legge 247
11 Sean Rayhall 196
12 Scott Sharp 128
12 Johannes van Overbeek 128
12 Luis Felipe Derani 128
13 Olivier Pla 113
14 Max Angelelli 113
15 Ryan Hunter-Reay 109
16 Spencer Pigot 95
17 Andy Meyrick 91
18 Filipe Albuquerque 88
19 Ed Brown 72
20 Ben Devlin 70
21 Scott Pruett 62
22 Simon Pagenaud 55
23 Rubens Barrichello 53
24 Nicolas Minassian 52
25 Byron DeFoor 46
25 Jim Pace 46
25 David Hinton 46
25 Dorsey Schroeder 46
26 Henrik Hedman 29
26 Nicolas Lapierre 29
27 Brendon Hartley 27
27 Andy Priaulx 27
27 Lance Stroll 27
27 Alex Wurz 27
28 Jonny Adam 26
29 Jamie McMurray 25
29 Scott Dixon 25
29 Tony Kanaan 25
29 Kyle Larson 25
30 Gabby Chaves 25
31 Thomas Gruber 24
32 Keiko Ihara 24
33 Maurizio Mediani 23
33 Kirill Ladygin 23
33 Mikhail Aleshin 23
34 AJ Allmendinger 21
35 Carlos de Quesada 21
35 Dominik Farnbacher 21
35 Cameron Lawrence 21
35 Daniel Morad 21
36 Andreas Wirth 20

Prototype Teams
1 #31 ACTION EXPRESS RACING 314
2 #5 ACTION EXPRESS RACING 311
3 #10 WAYNE TAYLOR RACING 309
4 #60 MICHAEL SHANK RACING 282
5 #90 VISITFLORIDA RACING 273
6 #70 MAZDA MOTORSPORTS 258
7 #55 MAZDA MOTORSPORTS 257
8 #0 PANOZ DELTAWING RACING 220
9 #2 TEQUILA PATRON ESM 128
10 #50 HIGHWAY TO HELP 46
11 #81 DRAGONSPEED 29
12 #01 FORD CHIP GANASSI RACING 27
13 #02 FORD CHIP GANASSI RACING 25
14 #37 SMP RACING 23
15 #24 ALEGRA MOTORSPORTS 21

Prototype Manufacturers
1 Chevrolet 338
2 Ligier 324
3 Mazda 304
4 Oreca 56
5 BR 30
The beginning of a new era at Audi

Audi R18 e-tron quattro to contest its first race
Friday, May 4, 2012

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Dr. Wolfgang Ulrich with the Audi R18 e-tron
The race debut of the Audi R18 e-tron quattro at Spa-Francorchamps this weekend signifies the beginning of a new era at Audi. For the first time ever, a Le Mans sports car with diesel hybrid drive and two driven axles will compete in a race. For Head of Audi Motorsport Dr. Wolfgang Ullrich, this is arguably the most challenging project in the more than 30-year history of Audi Sport.

Audi previously marked milestones at Le Mans with TFSI gasoline direct injection (first victory in 2001) and TDI diesel power (first victory in 2006). Now, at round two of the World Endurance Championship (WEC) at Spa, the company’s first diesel hybrid sports car will be contesting its first race. The birth of the idea for an LMP vehicle with diesel hybrid power and quattro drive at Audi Sport dates back several years though.

"We started to think about the hybridization of a Le Mans sports car relatively soon after the first TDI successes," reveals Head of Audi Motorsport Dr. Wolfgang Ullrich. "A concrete opportunity for this materialized when it became clear that the regulations would be permitting such an option." In 2008, the Le Mans organizer ACO announced this forward-thinking approach and since 2009 the regulations have expressly been allowing energy recovery systems for LMP1 cars. The complexity of the related tasks is shown by the fact that in 2012 Audi is the first automobile manufacturer to field such an LMP1 vehicle in a race.

The Audi R18 e-tron in testing
As usual, the project at Audi Sport commenced with concept studies. "Naturally, we were again able to benefit from the resources of the Technical Development division at AUDI AG," stresses Dr. Ullrich. "Right from the beginning of the project, we intensively liaised with our colleagues on the production side of the house where concepts are created and examined for future road vehicles. They worked out a solution in which one of the axles is driven by the power supplied by an internal combustion engine and the other by the power from an electric motor. This defines a new form of quattro drive - the e-tron quattro. We’re also pursuing this strategy in racing, which again puts us on the front row. Not only because we’ll be the first at Spa to contest a race with such a concept in an LMP race car, but because production development will be able to benefit from our system in the future as well."

For the R18 e-tron quattro, Audi has developed a concept in which the V6 TDI engine drives the rear axle. On the front axle, the energy is electrically recuperated und fed into a flywheel energy storage system which can return it to the front wheels during acceleration. This means that there is no mechanical link between the front and rear wheel drives. The interaction is completely controlled by complex electronic systems.

"The decision in favor of flywheel energy storage was made based on the specific requirements relating to racing," explains Dr. Ullrich. "That’s also why a battery system is currently out of the question in view of our ultra lightweight design. But I can safely state that the things we’re testing with flywheel energy storage are of interest to our production colleagues too. The combination of different systems is an aspect that will have to be considered in various applications in the future."

An Audi R8 GT provided the base for the first trials. "In the initial phase of the concept development for the R18 e-tron quattro when we wanted to get a trial vehicle off the ground as quickly as possible we came up with the idea of using the R8 GT as the base for it," says Dr. Ullrich. "The implementation was possible at relatively high levels of efficiency and we managed to package all the subsequent original components of the R18 e-tron quattro at the front end of the R8. That’s how our prototype for initial set-up and concept work was created."

In the development phase up to the finished race car, Audi set ambitious goals for developing the R18 e-tron quattro with support from various partners. Audi Sport has a track record of successfully managing numerous major technological challenges - from the brand’s first carbon fiber race car in 1999 through to TFSI gasoline direct injection and the TDI project. Building a sports prototype with a conventionally driven rear axle and an electrified front axle is an accomplishment that ranks at a particularly high level in Dr. Wolfgang Ullrich’s book: "A look at the timeline for the project since the beginning of 2010 shows that the e-tron quattro with its highly complex technological content and plenty of new territory was no doubt one of the most challenging projects we’ve ever had. At the same time, we should not forget that the R18 ultra as the lightest car ever built by Audi Sport created the prerequisites for hybridization in the first place. The overall complexity of this project is enormous."

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