for your iPhone
for your iPad
IndyCar

IndyCar Links

2014 Schedule

2014 IndyCar Rules

2014 Indy Lights Rules

2014 Pro Mazda Rules

2014 USF2000 Rules

2014 Drug Policy

2014 Teams

2013 Scanner Freq

Race Car Comparison

Lap Time Comparison

History CART/IRL Split


2014 Standings
After Long Beach
Pos. Driver Points

1 Will Power 93
2 Mike Conway 66
3 Simon Pagenaud 60
4 Helio Castroneves 55
5 Ryan Hunter-Reay 54
6 Scott Dixon 51
7 Carlos Munoz 48
8 Juan Pablo Montoya 47
9 Mikhail Aleshin 46
10 Sebastian Saavedra 42
11 Tony Kanaan 40
12 Justin Wilson 38
13 Takuma Sato 36
14 Josef Newgarden 34
15 Ryan Briscoe 33
16 Sebastien Bourdais 33
17 Graham Rahal 33
18 Marco Andretti 32
19 Carlos Huertas 32
20 Oriol Servia 26
21 Jack Hawksworth 24
22 James Hinchcliffe 20
23 Charlie Kimball 17

Wins
T1 Will Power 1
T1 Mike Conway 1

Podium Finishes
1 Will Power 2
T2 Ryan Hunter-Reay 1
T2 Helio Castroneves 1
T2 Mike Conway 1
T2 Carlos Munoz 1

Lap Leaders:
1 Will Power 74
2 Ryan Hunter-Reay 51
3 Takuma Sato 33
4 Scott Dixon 22
5 Mike Conway 4
6 Sebastian Saavedra 3
7 Helio Castroneves 2
8 Josef Newgarden 1


Prize Money
1 Will Power $50,000
T2 Mike Conway $30,000
T2 Ryan Hunter-Reay $30,000
4 Simon Pagenaud $18,000
5 Takuma Sato $17,000
T6 Helio Castroneves $15,000
T6 Carlos Munoz $15,000
T8 Juan Pablo Montoya $10,000
T8 Scott Dixon $10,000
T10 Mikhail Aleshin $8,000
T10 Tony Kanaan $8,000
12 Oriol Servia $7,000
T13 Justin Wilson $5,000
T13 Marco Andretti $5,000
T15 Sebastian Saavedra $4,000
T15 Josef Newgarden $4,000
T17 Ryan Briscoe $2,000
T17 Carlos Huertas $2,000

Entrant Points
Pos. # Entrant Points
1 12 Team Penske 93
2 20 Ed Carpenter Racing 66
3 77 Schmidt Peterson Motorsports 60
4 3 Team Penske 55
5 28 Andretti Autosport 54
6 9 Target Chip Ganassi Racing 51
7 34 Andretti Autosport HVM Racing 48
8 2 Team Penske 47
9 7 Schmidt Peterson Motorsports 46
10 17 KV AFS Racing 42
11 10 Target Chip Ganassi Racing 40
12 19 Dale Coyne Racing 38
13 14 A.J. Foyt Enterprises 36
14 67 Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing 34
15 8 NTT Data Chip Ganassi Racing 33
16 11 KVSH Racing 33
17 15 Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing 33
18 25 Andretti Autosport 32
19 18 Dale Coyne Racing 32
20 16 Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing 26
21 98 BHA/BBM with Curb-Agajanian 24
22 27 Andretti Autosport 20
23 83 Novo Nordisk Chip Ganassi Racing 17

Finishing Average
1 Will Power 1.5
2 Simon Pagenaud 5
T3 Helio Castroneves 7
T3 Oriol Servia 7
5 Scott Dixon 8
6 Mike Conway 8.5
7 Mikhail Aleshin 9
8 Juan Pablo Montoya 9.5
T9 Sebastian Saavedra 10
T9 Carlos Munoz 10
11 Ryan Hunter-Reay 11
T12 Tony Kanaan 12
T12 Justin Wilson 12
T14 Ryan Briscoe 13.5
T14 Sebastien Bourdais 13.5
T14 Graham Rahal 13.5
T17 Josef Newgarden 14
T17 Carlos Huertas 14
19 Takuma Sato 14.5
20 Marco Andretti 15
21 Jack Hawksworth 18
22 James Hinchcliffe 20
23 Charlie Kimball 21.5

Pole Positions
T1 Takuma Sato 1
T1 Ryan Hunter-Reay 1

Appearances in the Firestone Fast Six
1 Ryan Hunter-Reay 2
T2 Scott Dixon 1
T2 Tony Kanaan 1
T2 Sebastien Bourdais 1
T2 Will Power 1
T2 Takuma Sato 1
T2 Marco Andretti 1
T2 James Hinchcliffe 1
T2 Josef Newgarden 1
T2 Simon Pagenaud 1
T2 Jack Hawksworth 1

Qualifying Average
1 Ryan Hunter-Reay 2
2 Scott Dixon 6
3 Jack Hawksworth 6.5
4 Marco Andretti 7
5 Tony Kanaan 7.5
T6 Takuma Sato 8
T6 Sebastien Bourdais 8
T8 Will Power 9
T8 Carlos Munoz 9
10 Helio Castroneves 9.5
11 Simon Pagenaud 10
12 James Hinchcliffe 10.5
13 Oriol Servia 12
T14 Josef Newgarden 13
T14 Justin Wilson 13
16 Ryan Briscoe 13.5
17 Mike Conway 14.5
18 Sebastian Saavedra 16.5
19 Juan Pablo Montoya 17
20 Mikhail Aleshin 17.5
21 Carlos Huertas 19
22 Charlie Kimball 19.5
23 Graham Rahal 22
Texas Offers a Glimpse of What IndyCar Was, Should Be

by Stephen Cox
Sunday, June 10, 2012

Advertisement

Tagliani leads Dixon
“That's the best racing I've ever had on an oval.” - Will Power

The Firestone 550 at Texas Motor Speedway should go down in history as the most important IndyCar race in the last 30 years.

For the first time since Parnelli Jones retired, we saw racecars sliding in the turns on an oval track.

We have a long way to go, but thankfully, someone at IndyCar is finally doing what I've been harping about for many years... taking the downforce out of the racecars and letting them slide all over the track. At long, long last, the idea of losing traction is gaining traction. It is being publicly accepted and recognized as the salvation of Indycar's oval tradition.

Those of you who just saw the light on this topic are a couple of decades late to the party; nevertheless, we're glad you're finally on board.

NBC's announcers – who have generally done a fine job this year – expressed continual surprise Saturday night when drivers had to correct a sliding car in the corners. That alone should demonstrate to us the real state of this sport.

C'mon, guys. We shouldn't be surprised when cars slide in the corners. That's what cars are supposed to do. We should be alarmed when they don't. I don't know why someone didn't figure this out many years ago. When IndyCar drivers can run a track flat out (insert emphatic yawn here), something is very wrong with the series.

When is the last time you saw an IndyCar team on an oval making desperate changes to a racecar in a search for speed? Dario Franchitti's car was handling so badly early in the Texas event that they unhooked the rear sway bar. That's a massive change. That's the kind of change commonly seen on stock cars at local short tracks between the heat race and the feature.

It is glorious to see teams actually working on the basic setup of the car, rather than fine tuning near-perfect spec cars that can be driven flat out all the way around the track.

For the first time in recent memory, you could hear the drivers lifting off the throttle in the corners. This was dangerously close to real, authentic oval racing the way it ought to be. And the way it used to be.

After being a relative non-issue for years, tire wear was a huge factor at Texas. Why? The reduction in downforce causes the cars to slide in the corners, which stresses and heats the tires with much greater friction. Smoother drivers make their tires last longer and grip better during long green flag segments.

Drivers with less skill or those who are overly aggressive use up their tires quicker. This is a good thing. This allows better, smarter drivers to get to the front instead of being stuck in a pack of mediocre drivers who can all drive flat out for the entire race.

Scott Dixon's car seemed to “go away” around lap 180, and shortly afterward he smacked the wall. I'm certainly not happy to see anyone crash, but the very fact that the cars are changing during the race is cause for celebration.

This means that drivers must find a line that suits their car instead of driving anywhere they please with a car that sticks like glue in any groove. It means that the cars will become temperamental and sensitive to changes in temperature and humidity, which means that the crew and driver must communicate to constantly maintain the car's balance and handling.

Listen, people... when the cars slide in the corners, the whole game changes.

When cars slide in the corners, even heavyweights like Scott Dixon make mistakes. When cars slide in the corners, they must be driven on the edge of control at every moment and drivers like Graham Rahal can crack under the pressure.

When cars slide in the corners, Ganassi and Penske can actually be beaten by Dale Coyne's miniscule operation by good driving, good strategy and a dash of luck.

For the first time in decades, the cars were sliding in a full drift through the turns at Texas Motor Speedway. Stop and consider what this means.

We're talking about a fundamental shift in everything that is IndyCar. We're talking about oval races that become more entertaining than the road and street events. We're talking about increased fan demand for more ovals on the schedule.

What happens then? There is a real future for open wheel oval drivers across the country – drivers who have no hope and no future anywhere except NASCAR right now.

A whole host of new racetracks open up to IndyCar – tracks that are currently considered too “dangerous” for Indycar's old, pack-racing spec cars. These tracks can turn a profit because fans will show up secure in the knowledge that they'll be watching real racing.

By the way... the Firestone 550 at Texas was about 15 mph slower than last year's race. Did anyone care? Or even notice?

We still have spec cars, limited engine options and too much regulation from the series. There’s still a long way to go before IndyCar is a finished product.

But last weekend you could feel the ghosts of Billy Vukovich, Mauri Rose and Wilbur Shaw finally stirring from their long slumber.

The Firestone 550 was everything that oval racing should be, once was, and can be again.

Feedback can be sent to feedback@autoracing1.com

Go to our forums to discuss this article