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2014 Standings
After Pocono
Driver Standings

1 Will Power 446
2 Helio Castroneves 446
3 Simon Pagenaud 402
4 Juan Pablo Montoya 391
5 Ryan Hunter-Reay 388
6 Carlos Munoz (R) 340
7 Marco Andretti 325
8 Scott Dixon 297
9 Ryan Briscoe 285
10 Sebastien Bourdais 271
11 Tony Kanaan 267
12 James Hinchcliffe 266
13 Mikhail Aleshin 263
14 Justin Wilson 253
15 Charlie Kimball 239
16 Jack Hawksworth 227
17 Carlos Huertas (R) 224
18 Josef Newgarden 220
19 Graham Rahal 202
20 Sebastian Saavedra 196
21 Takuma Sato 189
22 Mike Conway 152
23 Ed Carpenter 138
24 Oriol Servia 88
25 Kurt Busch (R) 80
26 JR Hildebrand 66
27 Sage Karam (R) 57
28 James Davison (R) 34
29 Jacques Villeneuve 29
30 Alex Tagliani 28
31 Luca Filippi 24
32 Townsend Bell 22
33 Pippa Mann 21
34 Martin Plowman (R) 18
35 Buddy Lazier 11
36 Franck Montagny 8

Rookie of the Year
1 Carlos Munoz 340
2 Mikhail Aleshin 263
3 Jack Hawksworth 217
4 Carlos Huertas 204
5 Kurt Busch 80
6 Sage Karam 57
7 James Davison 34
8 Martin Plowman 18

Wins
T1 Ryan Hunter-Reay 2
T1 Will Power 2
T1 Simon Pagenaud 2
T4 Mike Conway 1
T4 Helio Castroneves 1
T4 Carlos Huertas 1
T4 Ed Carpenter 1
T4 Juan Pablo Montoya 1

Podium Finishes
T1 Will Power 5
T1 Helio Castroneves 5
2 Ryan Hunter-Reay 4
T3 Carlos Munoz 3
T3 Juan Pablo Montoya 3
T6 Marco Andretti 2
T6 Simon Pagenaud 2
T8 Mike Conway 1
T8 Carlos Huertas 1
T8 Scott Dixon 1
T8 Tony Kanaan 1
T8 Graham Rahal 1
T8 Charlie Kimball 1
T8 Ed Carpenter 1
T8 Jack Hawksworth 1
T8 Mikhail Aleshin 1

Lap Leaders:
1 Will Power 348
2 Helio Castroneves 174
3 Ryan Hunter-Reay 165
4 Ed Carpenter 116
5 Tony Kanaan 79
6 Juan Pablo Montoya 74
7 Takuma Sato 67
8 James Hinchcliffe 56
9 Simon Pagenaud 53
10 Jack Hawksworth 32
11 Scott Dixon 27
12 Marco Andretti 22
13 Justin Wilson 20
14 Sebastian Saavedra 14
15 Graham Rahal 10
16 Mike Conway 8
17 Josef Newgarden 8
T18 Oriol Servia 7
T18 Carlos Huertas 7
19 Ryan Briscoe 5
20 Mikhail Aleshin 4
21 Alex Tagliani 3
22 Sebastien Bourdais 2

Entrant Points
Pos. # Entrant Points
1 12 Team Penske 446
2 3 Team Penske 446
3 77 Schmidt Peterson Hamilton Motorsports 402
4 2 Team Penske 391
5 28 Andretti Autosport 388
6 34 Andretti Autosport/HVM 340
7 25 Andretti Autosport 325
8 9 Target Chip Ganassi Racing 297
9 20 Ed Carpenter Racing 290
10 8 NTT Data Chip Ganassi Racing 285
11 11 KVSH Racing 271
12 10 Target Chip Ganassi Racing 267
13 27 Andretti Autosport 266
14 7 SMP Racing 263
15 19 Dale Coyne Racing 253
16 83 Novo Nordisk Chip Ganassi Racing 239
17 98 BHA/BBM with Curb-Agajanian 227
18 18 Dale Coyne Racing 224
19 67 Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing 220
20 15 Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing 202
21 17 KV/AFS Racing 196
22 14 A.J. Foyt Racing 189
23 16 Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing 112
24 26 Andretti Autosport 88
25 21 Ed Carpenter Racing 66
26 22 Dreyer and Reinbold 57
27 33 KV Racing Technology 34
28 5 Schmidt Peterson Motorsports 29
29 68 Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing 28
30 6 KV Racing Technology 22
31 63 Dale Coyne Racing 21
32 41 A.J. Foyt Racing 18
33 91 Lazier Partners Racing 11

Finishing Average
1 Helio Castroneves 5.81
2 Kurt Busch 6.00
3 Will Power 6.09
4 Simon Pagenaud 6.72
5 Sage Karam 9.00
6 J.R. Hildebrand 10.00
T7 Scott Dixon 10.18
T7 Carlos Munoz 10.18
9 Juan Pablo Montoya 10.45
10 Ryan Hunter-Reay 10.72
11 Ryan Briscoe 11.75
12 Marco Andretti 12.125
13 Carlos Munoz 12.375
T14 Oriol Servia 12.5
T14 Justin Wilson 12.5
16 Alex Tagliani 13.0
17 Sebastien Bourdais 13.25
18 Charlie Kimball 13.625
19 Mike Conway 13.66
T20 Jacques Villeneuve 14.0
T20 Ed Carpenter 14.0
22 Carlos Huertas 14.25
23 Mikhail Aleshin 14.875
24 James Hinchcliffe 15.125
T25 Takuma Sato 15.5
T25 Jack Hawksworth 15.5
27 Sebastian Saavedra 15.75
28 James Davison 16.00
29 Josef Newgarden 16.375
30 Graham Rahal 16.625
31 Martin Plowman 20.5
32 Franck Montagny 22.0
33 Pippa Mann 24.0
34 Townsend Bell 25.0
35 Buddy Lazier 32.0

Pole Positions
T1 Takuma Sato 2
T1 Will Power 2
T1 Helio Castroneves 2
T4 Ryan Hunter-Reay 1
T4 Sebastian Saavedra 1
T4 Ed Carpenter 1
T4 Simon Pagenaud 1
T4 Juan Pablo Montoya 1

Appearances in the Firestone Fast Six
1 Ryan Hunter-Reay 4
T2 Scott Dixon 3
T2 Will Power 3
T2 James Hinchcliffe 3
T2 Helio Castroneves 3
T2 Jack Hawksworth 3
T7 Simon Pagenaud 2
T7 Josef Newgarden 2
T9 Takuma Sato 1
T9 Marco Andretti 1
T9 Sebastien Bourdais 1
T9 Tony Kanaan 1
T9 Sebastian Saavedra 1
T9 Mike Conway 1
T9 Juan Pablo Montoya 1
T9 Ryan Briscoe 1
The failed Barrichello experiment and what it means

by Stephen Cox
Monday, January 14, 2013

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Barrichello proved that F1 drivers are no better than IndyCar drivers
The most experienced driver in the history of Formula 1 has been sent packing after just one mediocre year in IndyCar.

Instead of returning to dominate America's most prestigious open wheel series, Barrichello will spend next year driving in the Brazilian Stock Car Series. Yes, there is such a thing. I've seen their web site.

There are two big lessons to take away from the Barrichello story, and in a bizarre sort of way, they both bear wonderful tidings for every aspiring race car driver on the continent.

Lesson Number One – the car makes the driver, not the other way around.

Formula 1 snobs are fond of claiming superiority over American open wheel pilots. As evidence, they point to Michael Andretti's modest results in Europe compared to the success of Emerson Fittipaldi and Nigel Mansell in IndyCar.

The fact is that Fittipaldi and Mansell drove for Penske and Newman-Haas, two of the most successful race teams in IndyCar history. Their equipment was superior, their team personnel was superior and their budget was superior. They certainly drove well, but their success was predictable. Likewise, Andretti got about as much from his F1 experience as did those before and after him in similar circumstances.

Barrichello at Milwaukee
The Barrichello experience gives us a raw and telling insight into professional auto racing. Rubens was a consistent frontrunner in F1 but was mid-pack at best in IndyCar. That doesn't make him less a driver. Conversely, it doesn't make Fittipaldi, Mansell, Vettel or Alonso any better than their American counterparts.

What it does tell us is simply this... Barrichello enjoyed a superior car and budget at Ferrari and performed accordingly. But when the major disparity between F1 cars is taken out of the equation and F1 drivers are in equal cars with everyone else, their performance is just what you'd expect. Mid-pack or so. There is no magical difference between European, South American and North American drivers.

As a race driver, you are no better than your car and your budget. The glory days when a driver could hoist a car upon his shoulders and carry it to victory are long gone. If you attempt to drive a racing car beyond its capacity in this era, you will punch a very large hole in a nearby concrete wall.

Within a few hundredths of a second, a car will do what a car will do and the driver's impact on that result is no greater than the engineer's or team manager's. This is truly a team sport.

Richard Petty learned this lesson ages ago. He never tried to be a better driver than everyone else. He tried to have a better car.

We all know how that turned out.

Lesson Number Two – If Rubens Freaking Barrichello needs money to get a ride, so do you.

If you are an aspiring race car driver and the only way you can get a ride is by bringing money... well... take a number. The line starts here.

Don't feel bad. It's not just you. It's everyone.

I'll be driving in four racing series this year. You know how many of my rides depend on bringing sponsorship deals to the team? Every last one of 'em.

It is downright amusing to hear the constant chatter from the racing media about the latest teen sensation as “fresh, new talent.” What they really mean is “fresh, new money.” Sure, the kid may be good, but you can find talented racing drivers in every corner of the globe. The real find wasn't the driver, it was the father's checkbook.

Don't get me wrong. Every father wants to give his kid a good start in life and I don't begrudge these people their chance.

The point is simply this – the most experienced driver in the history of Formula 1 just lost his ride because he couldn't bring sponsorship money to support it. And the flip side of that coin is... that means you can do it.  That means this isn't magic and these guys aren't supermen.

The world is beginning to wake up to the fact that being “really good” doesn't get you a ride. Yes, talent is required, but there's more to the game than that. If you can raise the money and show some genuine ability and promise, you can get there, too.

Remember, Rubens had to do it, too. And that's good news for everyone. 

Stephen Cox

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