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History CART/IRL Split


2014 Standings
After Long Beach
Pos. Driver Points

1 Will Power 93
2 Mike Conway 66
3 Simon Pagenaud 60
4 Helio Castroneves 55
5 Ryan Hunter-Reay 54
6 Scott Dixon 51
7 Carlos Munoz 48
8 Juan Pablo Montoya 47
9 Mikhail Aleshin 46
10 Sebastian Saavedra 42
11 Tony Kanaan 40
12 Justin Wilson 38
13 Takuma Sato 36
14 Josef Newgarden 34
15 Ryan Briscoe 33
16 Sebastien Bourdais 33
17 Graham Rahal 33
18 Marco Andretti 32
19 Carlos Huertas 32
20 Oriol Servia 26
21 Jack Hawksworth 24
22 James Hinchcliffe 20
23 Charlie Kimball 17

Wins
T1 Will Power 1
T1 Mike Conway 1

Podium Finishes
1 Will Power 2
T2 Ryan Hunter-Reay 1
T2 Helio Castroneves 1
T2 Mike Conway 1
T2 Carlos Munoz 1

Lap Leaders:
1 Will Power 74
2 Ryan Hunter-Reay 51
3 Takuma Sato 33
4 Scott Dixon 22
5 Mike Conway 4
6 Sebastian Saavedra 3
7 Helio Castroneves 2
8 Josef Newgarden 1


Prize Money
1 Will Power $50,000
T2 Mike Conway $30,000
T2 Ryan Hunter-Reay $30,000
4 Simon Pagenaud $18,000
5 Takuma Sato $17,000
T6 Helio Castroneves $15,000
T6 Carlos Munoz $15,000
T8 Juan Pablo Montoya $10,000
T8 Scott Dixon $10,000
T10 Mikhail Aleshin $8,000
T10 Tony Kanaan $8,000
12 Oriol Servia $7,000
T13 Justin Wilson $5,000
T13 Marco Andretti $5,000
T15 Sebastian Saavedra $4,000
T15 Josef Newgarden $4,000
T17 Ryan Briscoe $2,000
T17 Carlos Huertas $2,000

Entrant Points
Pos. # Entrant Points
1 12 Team Penske 93
2 20 Ed Carpenter Racing 66
3 77 Schmidt Peterson Motorsports 60
4 3 Team Penske 55
5 28 Andretti Autosport 54
6 9 Target Chip Ganassi Racing 51
7 34 Andretti Autosport HVM Racing 48
8 2 Team Penske 47
9 7 Schmidt Peterson Motorsports 46
10 17 KV AFS Racing 42
11 10 Target Chip Ganassi Racing 40
12 19 Dale Coyne Racing 38
13 14 A.J. Foyt Enterprises 36
14 67 Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing 34
15 8 NTT Data Chip Ganassi Racing 33
16 11 KVSH Racing 33
17 15 Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing 33
18 25 Andretti Autosport 32
19 18 Dale Coyne Racing 32
20 16 Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing 26
21 98 BHA/BBM with Curb-Agajanian 24
22 27 Andretti Autosport 20
23 83 Novo Nordisk Chip Ganassi Racing 17

Finishing Average
1 Will Power 1.5
2 Simon Pagenaud 5
T3 Helio Castroneves 7
T3 Oriol Servia 7
5 Scott Dixon 8
6 Mike Conway 8.5
7 Mikhail Aleshin 9
8 Juan Pablo Montoya 9.5
T9 Sebastian Saavedra 10
T9 Carlos Munoz 10
11 Ryan Hunter-Reay 11
T12 Tony Kanaan 12
T12 Justin Wilson 12
T14 Ryan Briscoe 13.5
T14 Sebastien Bourdais 13.5
T14 Graham Rahal 13.5
T17 Josef Newgarden 14
T17 Carlos Huertas 14
19 Takuma Sato 14.5
20 Marco Andretti 15
21 Jack Hawksworth 18
22 James Hinchcliffe 20
23 Charlie Kimball 21.5

Pole Positions
T1 Takuma Sato 1
T1 Ryan Hunter-Reay 1

Appearances in the Firestone Fast Six
1 Ryan Hunter-Reay 2
T2 Scott Dixon 1
T2 Tony Kanaan 1
T2 Sebastien Bourdais 1
T2 Will Power 1
T2 Takuma Sato 1
T2 Marco Andretti 1
T2 James Hinchcliffe 1
T2 Josef Newgarden 1
T2 Simon Pagenaud 1
T2 Jack Hawksworth 1

Qualifying Average
1 Ryan Hunter-Reay 2
2 Scott Dixon 6
3 Jack Hawksworth 6.5
4 Marco Andretti 7
5 Tony Kanaan 7.5
T6 Takuma Sato 8
T6 Sebastien Bourdais 8
T8 Will Power 9
T8 Carlos Munoz 9
10 Helio Castroneves 9.5
11 Simon Pagenaud 10
12 James Hinchcliffe 10.5
13 Oriol Servia 12
T14 Josef Newgarden 13
T14 Justin Wilson 13
16 Ryan Briscoe 13.5
17 Mike Conway 14.5
18 Sebastian Saavedra 16.5
19 Juan Pablo Montoya 17
20 Mikhail Aleshin 17.5
21 Carlos Huertas 19
22 Charlie Kimball 19.5
23 Graham Rahal 22
Racing past 40: Part 1

by Stephen Cox
Sunday, June 09, 2013

Advertisement

Mario Andretti in 1992 with Paul Newman.  He would win his last IndyCar race the following year, April 1993, at Phoenix, at the age of 53.
I have wonderful news. Being twenty-one years old doesn't really make you good at anything. It just makes you twenty-one.

Sprint car driver Steve Kinser is living proof. He remains a consistent front-runner in his late fifties, despite the fact that sprint cars are a young man's game. Steve Christmann is a winner in ARCA Trucks at age 62. Mario Andretti won his last IndyCar race at the age of 53.  Dick Simon scored a top ten finish at the Indy 500 at age 55. And it's not just racing drivers.

At 46, mountaineer Ed Viesturs became the first American to climb all fourteen of the world's 8000-meter peaks... without oxygen. But then, Viesturs could do a 4-minute plank and run flat out for seven miles at high altitude when he was 50. Try that sometime, but have an ambulance on stand-by. It's quite an education.

At 47, George Foreman won the world heavyweight boxing title. You could make the argument that getting plastered by a 47-year-old George Foreman is still the rough equivalent of placing one's face in front of a locomotive, but the point remains.

And just to be completely ridiculous, Jack LaLanne swam a mile and a half across Long Beach Harbor at age 70. Handcuffed. While towing 70 boats full of people on a rope attached to a bit in his mouth. I swear I am not making this up.

So in genuine sports (not games) in which success isn't defined by foot speed, jumping ability, or how hard you can throw a ball, you can pretty much be a contender as long as you remain in good physical condition.

How do you stay in good physical condition? Do the stuff you already know. The stuff you did when you were twenty-one. 1) Maintain flexibility. 2) Have a good cardio program. And 3) avoid George Foreman. I firmly believe that basic physical conditioning is nearly as important to a racing driver's safety as wearing a helmet. Here's why...

If you don't stretch anything else, stretch your “hams.” The hamstrings tighten up over time. This results in a pulling pressure on the lower back, which causes all sorts of spinal misalignment and back pain even if you're not a racing driver. If your hamstrings are tight, the resulting crash damage will be more severe and have a domino effect down into the legs and knees, and up the vertebrae. You can help yourself a lot in advance by maintaining good flexibility, especially in your hamstrings.

A good cardio program provides rich oxygenation to the blood, which has a near-miraculous effect on speeding recovery from injuries. That's why those amazing magnet thingies work so well - they draw blood to the damaged area. You can help the process considerably with cardio exercise, which enables your blood to carry more oxygen. Other benefits include improved alertness, better resistance to heat inside closed cockpits, and superior focus and concentration. We all know that, but how many of us do it?

When 49-year-old Emerson Fittipaldi smacked the wall at Michigan International Speedway in 1996, impacts above 180 g's were generally considered to be fatal. His doctors credited Fittipaldi's survival to his incredible physical condition.

So my humble suggestion is to consider your workout regimen as part of your safety program, just like your helmet and roll cage. Work on your physical flexibility, with a special focus on your hamstrings and lower back. Keep chipping away at cardio to maintain good oxygenation in your blood.

And forget about age. 58-year-old, chain-smoking Steve Kinser breaks every health rule in the book and is still the man to beat in his version of the sport. Cheer up, shape up and keep racing. Winners come from all age brackets.

Stephen Cox

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