for your iPhone
for your iPad
IndyCar

IndyCar Links

2014 Schedule

2014 IndyCar Rules

2014 Indy Lights Rules

2014 Pro Mazda Rules

2014 USF2000 Rules

2014 Drug Policy

2014 Teams

2013 Scanner Freq

Race Car Comparison

Lap Time Comparison

History CART/IRL Split


2014 Standings
After Long Beach
Pos. Driver Points

1 Will Power 93
2 Mike Conway 66
3 Simon Pagenaud 60
4 Helio Castroneves 55
5 Ryan Hunter-Reay 54
6 Scott Dixon 51
7 Carlos Munoz 48
8 Juan Pablo Montoya 47
9 Mikhail Aleshin 46
10 Sebastian Saavedra 42
11 Tony Kanaan 40
12 Justin Wilson 38
13 Takuma Sato 36
14 Josef Newgarden 34
15 Ryan Briscoe 33
16 Sebastien Bourdais 33
17 Graham Rahal 33
18 Marco Andretti 32
19 Carlos Huertas 32
20 Oriol Servia 26
21 Jack Hawksworth 24
22 James Hinchcliffe 20
23 Charlie Kimball 17

Wins
T1 Will Power 1
T1 Mike Conway 1

Podium Finishes
1 Will Power 2
T2 Ryan Hunter-Reay 1
T2 Helio Castroneves 1
T2 Mike Conway 1
T2 Carlos Munoz 1

Lap Leaders:
1 Will Power 74
2 Ryan Hunter-Reay 51
3 Takuma Sato 33
4 Scott Dixon 22
5 Mike Conway 4
6 Sebastian Saavedra 3
7 Helio Castroneves 2
8 Josef Newgarden 1


Prize Money
1 Will Power $50,000
T2 Mike Conway $30,000
T2 Ryan Hunter-Reay $30,000
4 Simon Pagenaud $18,000
5 Takuma Sato $17,000
T6 Helio Castroneves $15,000
T6 Carlos Munoz $15,000
T8 Juan Pablo Montoya $10,000
T8 Scott Dixon $10,000
T10 Mikhail Aleshin $8,000
T10 Tony Kanaan $8,000
12 Oriol Servia $7,000
T13 Justin Wilson $5,000
T13 Marco Andretti $5,000
T15 Sebastian Saavedra $4,000
T15 Josef Newgarden $4,000
T17 Ryan Briscoe $2,000
T17 Carlos Huertas $2,000

Entrant Points
Pos. # Entrant Points
1 12 Team Penske 93
2 20 Ed Carpenter Racing 66
3 77 Schmidt Peterson Motorsports 60
4 3 Team Penske 55
5 28 Andretti Autosport 54
6 9 Target Chip Ganassi Racing 51
7 34 Andretti Autosport HVM Racing 48
8 2 Team Penske 47
9 7 Schmidt Peterson Motorsports 46
10 17 KV AFS Racing 42
11 10 Target Chip Ganassi Racing 40
12 19 Dale Coyne Racing 38
13 14 A.J. Foyt Enterprises 36
14 67 Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing 34
15 8 NTT Data Chip Ganassi Racing 33
16 11 KVSH Racing 33
17 15 Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing 33
18 25 Andretti Autosport 32
19 18 Dale Coyne Racing 32
20 16 Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing 26
21 98 BHA/BBM with Curb-Agajanian 24
22 27 Andretti Autosport 20
23 83 Novo Nordisk Chip Ganassi Racing 17

Finishing Average
1 Will Power 1.5
2 Simon Pagenaud 5
T3 Helio Castroneves 7
T3 Oriol Servia 7
5 Scott Dixon 8
6 Mike Conway 8.5
7 Mikhail Aleshin 9
8 Juan Pablo Montoya 9.5
T9 Sebastian Saavedra 10
T9 Carlos Munoz 10
11 Ryan Hunter-Reay 11
T12 Tony Kanaan 12
T12 Justin Wilson 12
T14 Ryan Briscoe 13.5
T14 Sebastien Bourdais 13.5
T14 Graham Rahal 13.5
T17 Josef Newgarden 14
T17 Carlos Huertas 14
19 Takuma Sato 14.5
20 Marco Andretti 15
21 Jack Hawksworth 18
22 James Hinchcliffe 20
23 Charlie Kimball 21.5

Pole Positions
T1 Takuma Sato 1
T1 Ryan Hunter-Reay 1

Appearances in the Firestone Fast Six
1 Ryan Hunter-Reay 2
T2 Scott Dixon 1
T2 Tony Kanaan 1
T2 Sebastien Bourdais 1
T2 Will Power 1
T2 Takuma Sato 1
T2 Marco Andretti 1
T2 James Hinchcliffe 1
T2 Josef Newgarden 1
T2 Simon Pagenaud 1
T2 Jack Hawksworth 1

Qualifying Average
1 Ryan Hunter-Reay 2
2 Scott Dixon 6
3 Jack Hawksworth 6.5
4 Marco Andretti 7
5 Tony Kanaan 7.5
T6 Takuma Sato 8
T6 Sebastien Bourdais 8
T8 Will Power 9
T8 Carlos Munoz 9
10 Helio Castroneves 9.5
11 Simon Pagenaud 10
12 James Hinchcliffe 10.5
13 Oriol Servia 12
T14 Josef Newgarden 13
T14 Justin Wilson 13
16 Ryan Briscoe 13.5
17 Mike Conway 14.5
18 Sebastian Saavedra 16.5
19 Juan Pablo Montoya 17
20 Mikhail Aleshin 17.5
21 Carlos Huertas 19
22 Charlie Kimball 19.5
23 Graham Rahal 22
10 Great Race Tracks Part III: Winchester Speedway

by Stephen Cox
Monday, September 02, 2013

Advertisement

Winchester 1936
In the spring of 1914, Indiana farmer Frank Funk had an idea.

This whole newfangled automobile thing seemed to be catching on. Lots of folks were racing them. Carl Fisher had recently built a big oval near Indianapolis and scads of people were paying to see his 500-mile race every year.

Funk had made good money in farming. He had plenty of acreage, and his fields just west of the small town of Winchester didn't grow enough corn to affect his bottom line either way. So why not try his hand in the auto racing industry?

By the summer of 1916, Funk's Motor Speedway was in business. Big business. And it has remained active ever since, making it the third-oldest race track in the United States and among the oldest circuits in the world. Today the same facility is known as Winchester Speedway.

From the 1920's through the 60's, Winchester was a primary training ground for Indy 500 drivers. Ironically, the grandstands held 6,000 fans – considerably more than the 4,000-seat capacity of today – and they were usually full.

Winchester 1950
Despite being one of the highest banked tracks in existence and perhaps the fastest half mile anywhere, Winchester Speedway originally had no guardrails. A mistake in one of Winchester's 100-mile-per-hour corners was likely to launch a hapless driver into orbit.

The track was designed with a clay surface and remained as such until it was paved in the 1960's. Dust was a serious problem during Winchester's early years and Funk solved the issue – mostly – by dousing the track with oil just prior to each event.

The famed oval has remained virtually unchanged for more than one hundred years. The layout hasn't been altered by an inch. The insane 34-degree banking (parts of the track reach 37 degrees) harkens back to a day when racing really was dangerous and there was no such thing as a routine crash. The grandstands are a bit smaller and have no roof, but occupy the exact same place and position as in 1916. The track is still recognizable, even from photographs dating to the early 20th century.

Winchester 1948 Program
Throughout the 1970's, Winchester continued to attract the biggest names in open wheel racing. Unser, Foyt, Andretti, Bigelow, Bettenhausen, McCluskey... the list of drivers who competed at Winchester is a Who's Who of American auto racing.

But Winchester fell on hard times when IndyCar abandoned American short tracks and their drivers in the early 1980's. Rather than the birthplace of Indy champions, Winchester Speedway became just another bullring struggling for survival. 

Chatting with current owner Charlie Shaw Saturday night just before the green flag fell on the World Stock Car Festival, I asked him how Winchester could respond to this challenge.

“The people in open wheel racing are going on to NASCAR,” Shaw responded. “The big challenge now is to get them through here and into NASCAR, and then get some of those drivers to come back and run in our races.”

“Usually, on a given Sunday, more than half of the drivers in the field in NASCAR have raced here. That's not nearly as well known as the [track's connection] with the Indy drivers. I don't think I've done a real good job of getting that conveyed, but that's actually a fact,” Shaw concluded.

Winchester 1956
Winchester Speedway still requires more sheer courage than any track I've ever experienced. Admittedly, I've not driven all the major speedways in North America, nor do I make any such claim. But I've raced enough of them to make a comparison. The Milwaukee Mile, Texas Motor Speedway, Iowa Speedway and many others are all great circuits, but I assure you that not one of them takes your breath away like Winchester. The place is wickedly fast and genuinely treacherous. The g-forces are staggering.

Shaw said of short track ace Gary St. Amant, “They're getting a 3,000 to 3,200-pound load on the front wheels when they go into the corner. Well, if you think about it, that's more than the weight of the car and people have a hard time getting used to that.”

“Some of the greats didn't win any races here. It's humbled some people. I've had NASCAR drivers tell me that this place fascinates them and they have a chill run up their back when they get out there.”

If you are a driver and you want a real gut check, race at Winchester Speedway. You'll find out what you're made of very quickly. If you are a race fan and want an authentic American short track experience, go to Winchester Speedway.

And hurry. The track's future is not guaranteed. It was Shaw's purchase of the facility that prevented it from being shut down long ago. There aren't many Frank Funks left.

When I asked Shaw if he realized that he was the modern incarnation of the old farmer who built the track, he shrugged, “I never considered myself a big promoter... I just didn't want to see it close.”

Stephen Cox

Feedback can be sent to feedback@autoracing1.com

Go to our forums to discuss this article