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Details of FIA and Ferrari meeting
Meeting of Formula One Team Principals and the FIA
February 2, 2005


London Heathrow Hilton, Friday 28 January 2005

Draft Minutes

Present:
Max Mosley, FIA
Charlie Whiting, FIA
Richard Woods, FIA
Jean Todt, Ferrari
Ross Brawn, Ferrari

Max Mosley (right) welcomed the participants to the meeting. He explained that although all the teams had been invited, he understood none except Ferrari intended to come. The meeting was to discuss rules for 2008, but it should consider in respect of each item whether earlier implementation would be possible.

Earlier implementation would, of course, require unanimous agreement of the teams for any technical measures, while both technical and sporting measures would need a favorable vote in the Formula One Commission and the World Motor Sport Council. Any potential changes for 2006 would be raised by Charlie Whiting at the next Technical Working Group meeting or in his next meeting with the team managers, as appropriate.

1. Possible technical and sporting measures to reduce costs

Standard ECU

Jean Todt explained that Ferrari supported the principle of a standard ECU, but proposed that a feasibility study be carried out.
The FIA was in favor of a standard ECU for the following reasons:

  • it would represent a significant cost saving;
  • it would enable the FIA to check for the presence of systems such as traction control;
  • it would enable the FIA to check mileage if necessary.
    It was therefore agreed that the FIA would set up a working group to investigate all aspects of this proposal and to report back to the teams at the next meeting. The implementation for such a system was proposed for 2008.

    Standard brakes
    Jean Todt explained that Ferrari would prefer not to have a standard brake system. They were however in favor of long life brakes and said that either of these systems would represent a saving of around 1 million.
    The FIA was in favor of a standard braking system.
    The implementation for such a system was proposed for 2008, but would be possible in 2006.

    Centre of gravity and minimum weight regulations for chassis and certain chassis components analogous to those for engines
    Jean Todt explained that Ferrari was in favor of such measures as to date they were proving to be a positive step in terms of engine development. They proposed that the Technical Working Group be given a mandate by the FIA to conduct a proper investigation into this issue in order to save costs and improve safety. This was agreed.
    The implementation of such measures was proposed for 2008.

    Bodywork Regulations to reduce potential for aerodynamic development
    Jean Todt explained that this would make the car simpler to design and could be an interim measure. However they felt that it might in the short term create extra expense and should therefore only be introduced within the package of new measures for 2008. This was agreed.

    Bodywork Regulations to improve visibility of sponsors
    Jean Todt explained that Ferrari felt that it was important to take this issue into account in the package of new measures for 2008. This was agreed.

    Designs to be homologated and fixed for specified periods of time
    Jean Todt explained that Ferrari was in favor of this as it would make component production more efficient and thus reduce costs. This could form part of the package of new measures for 2008. Ferrari would be in favor of two changes during the season in addition to the original specification at the beginning of the season. The FIA was confident that it could control such a regulation and felt that it could be introduced as early as 2006.

    Long life components
    Ross Brawn had calculated that Ferrari would save at least 1.6 million if long life transmissions and uprights were introduced. The FIA was in favor of this for cost saving reasons and proposed that they could be introduced in 2006 if a decision were taken by April 2005.

    Further extension of life of engine
    Ross Brawn said that Ferrari felt that this could be considered for introduction in 2008. He felt that the effects of the two-race engine should be studied first. This was noted.

    RPM limit for engine
    Ross Brawn said that Ferrari felt that there should be some means of constraining engine performance but not necessarily RPM. This was noted and the FIA would seek the views of other engine manufacturers on this matter.

    Very substantial reduction in downforce (e.g. down to 10% of current levels)
    It was noted that there was a strong argument that such measures would make the racing much closer, increase the number of overtaking possibilities and improve safety on high speed corners if done in conjunction with a major increase in tire grip eg wide slick tires. It was therefore agreed that the FIA should commission an independent expert to study this issue in more detail. It was proposed to implement any changes in 2008.

    Standard transmission and drivetrain
    Jean Todt said that Ferrari was supportive of this proposal which would represent a saving of 2 million for Ferrari. The FIA was in favor of this for cost saving reasons and proposed that such a regulation could be introduced in 2006 if a decision were taken soon.

    Limitations on materials which may be used throughout the car, similar to those for the engine
    Ross Brawn said that Ferrari was supportive of this proposal and felt that this could be achieved by means of a list of approved materials, both metallic and composite. The FIA was in favor of this for cost saving reasons and proposed that such a regulation could be introduced in 2006.

    Driver must be able to start the car unaided with on-board system
    Jean Todt said that Ferrari supported this proposal and that they could make savings in terms of the number of people needed to support the cars. It would also help with the sales of Formula One cars onto private buyers. The FIA was in favor of this for cost saving reasons and proposed that such a regulation could be introduced in 2006.

    Single tire supplier
    The FIA was strongly in favor of this. Jean Todt proposed that the FIA invite the tire manufacturers to a meeting to discuss this in further detail. This was agreed.

    Slick tires with only three compounds, fixed for the entire season
    It was agreed to discuss this issue at the above proposed meeting with the tire manufacturers.

    Prohibition of tire blankets and all tire warming devices
    The FIA felt that this would result in significant cost reductions. Jean Todt said that Ferrari felt that this could be introduced in the future as long as the teams were given enough notice. He added that it should also be discussed with the tire manufacturers. This was agreed. The implementation of such a regulation was proposed for 2008.

    No spare car
    The FIA was strongly in favor of this as it would result in significant cost savings. Ross Brawn said that Ferrari was in favor of this proposal and that this would make a saving for them of 1.2 million, primarily in terms of staff, parts and freight. The implementation of such a regulation was proposed for 2006.

    Two-day Grand Prix weekend
    The FIA said that there was a case for using the Friday of a Grand Prix weekend as a test day and that it was more natural to have the practice and qualifying sessions on Saturday and the race on a Sunday. Jean Todt proposed that this could be looked at in the future discussions on race and testing formats. This was agreed.

    Elimination of the 3rd car on Fridays
    The FIA was in favor of this if the Grand Prix weekend was to still include running on the Friday. Jean Todt explained that Ferrari felt that if there was a sound commercial reason for a small team to do this, e.g. in terms of sponsorship, this could be allowed as it could represent a significant income stream, especially for the independent teams. The implementation of such a regulation was proposed for 2006.

    Further measures to reduce number of staff needed at races
    It was agreed to study the number of people currently involved in pit stops to see if this should be reduced. For example, with routine tire stops no longer allowed, a restriction to one man per wheel might be acceptable for the rare occasions when weather conditions or an incident might necessitate a tire change. Ross Brawn said that the introduction of such measures as a standard ECU and the driver starting the car unaided would reduce the number of people needed at the races. This was noted.

    2. Possible general regulatory measures to reduce costs

    Freeze technical and sporting regulations for a long period 3 years

    It was agreed that short term technical changes did incur significant costs but that a freeze of regulations for three years could be too long.

    Announce changes well in advance
    It was agreed that this would help to control and reduce costs.

    Significant testing restrictions
    The FIA said that the only way to regulate testing effectively would be to introduce a rule, rather than attempt a voluntary agreement between the teams. The following restrictions were seen to be the most feasible in order to reduce costs:
  • that testing should be regulated by the FIA;
  • that it should be based on mileage rather than days;
  • that there should be no testing on Grand Prix circuits other than Barcelona, Monza and Silverstone; and
  • that testing should be split into in-season and out-of- season.
    Ross Brawn felt that the proposed limit of testing on 30 out of a maximum of 45 days with two cars running at any one time would not reduce costs as three prepared cars and four available crews would be needed to maximize running time each day. It would also save no money for small teams. He preferred a test limitation based on mileage rather than days. A proposal for an implementation date for this would be made following the proposed meeting with the tire manufacturers.

    Compulsory breaks in race and test programs
    Ferrari was in favor of these for their staff. The FIA agreed and added that it was only in favor of back to back races for the flyaway races. It was therefore agreed that all the other races should be held on alternate weekends with a three week break in August. The implementation for such a system was proposed for 2006, as it could be consistent with the 16-week winter break required by the Concorde Agreement.

    Engine suppliers to make engines available on similar basis to current tire supply rules
    The FIA was not in favor of this, preferring to leave engine supply to market forces. Ferrari agreed.

    Freedom to sell components (including the entire chassis) and transfer intellectual property rights
    The FIA and Ferrari were both in favor of this. The implementation for such a system was proposed for the 2006 season.

    Salary cap for drivers on same principles as those adopted in other sports The FIA was not in favor of this. Ferrari agreed.

    Maximum age for second driver
    The FIA was not in favor of this. Ferrari agreed.

    3. Possible proposals to Commercial Rights Holder

    It was agreed that the FIA would set up a working group with representatives of all relevant stakeholders to develop more detailed proposals for discussion with the commercial rights holder.

    4. Fax votes of the Formula One Commission

    Results of the most recent fax vote of the Formula One Commission
    Max Mosley explained that Mr Ecclestone had told him one or two teams had questioned the recent fax vote and suggested that fewer than 18 members of the Formula One Commission had replied. Max Mosley said that this was untrue and that he had brought all the faxed replies with him to the meeting. He explained that there had been 21 votes in favor and one against the sporting regulations and 20 votes in favor and two against the technical regulations. He added that two promoters, namely Messrs Legault and Walker, and two teams, namely Toyota and McLaren, had not replied and had therefore not voted. This was noted.

    5. Structure of the Formula One Commission after 1 January 2008

    Max Mosley explained that the FIA proposed to make the following changes to the structure of the Concorde Agreement from 2008:
  • any change to the technical regulations should require no more than a 70% majority of the teams; but
  • any decision taken by majority would need to be confirmed by a (unanimous) decision of the Permanent Bureau.
    Jean Todt felt that the Formula One Commission did not function as well as it should at the moment. It was unclear what the Commission achieved in reality and if it was really needed in the future. An alternative might be for the Technical Working Group and for a new Sporting Working Group to make proposals directly to a reviewed Formula 1 Commission. It was therefore agreed that the role of the Formula One Commission be reviewed, particularly in light of the creation of a Sporting Working Group.

    6. Date of next meeting

    It was agreed to hold the next meeting on Friday 15 April at the FIA headquarters in Paris from 1430hrs.

    -FIA-

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