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The History of F1 Auto Racing
Part III : F1's technical advances and stages
March 9, 2005

Many changes have been made to the technical specifications of the Formula One car over the years in order to reduce speed, ensure safety and decrease costs.

The following are the different technical stages of the championship:

1950-1951
The engine was set at 1500cc with supercharging or 4500cc without supercharger. Car weight was not specified.

1952-1953
The world championship of Formula One for drivers was organized alongside Formula 2. The engine was set at 2000cc without supercharger or 500cc with supercharger. Car weight was not specified.

1954-1960
The world championship focused on Formula One. The engine was specified at 750cc with supercharging and 2500cc without supercharger. Car weight was not specified.

1961-1965
Engine capacity was set at a maximum of 1500cc and a minimum of 1300cc without supercharger. The car weight was specified at 450 kg excluding fuel.


Andretti Monza 1968


1971 Kyalami South Africa
Andretti drives to first F1 win

1966-1969
An engine of 1500cc with supercharging or 3000cc without supercharger and a minimum car weight of 500 kg excluding fuel.

1970-1971
Car engine specification remained however car weight was amended to 530 kg.

1972
Car engine specification remained but car weight increased to 550 kg.

1973-1980
Car engine specification remained but car weight rose to 575 kg.

1981
Car engine specification remained the same but car weight increased to 585 kg.

1982
Car engine specification remained but car weight decreased to 580 kg.

1983
Car engine specification remained but car weight dropped back to 540 kg.


Monza 1982: Andretti on pole in turbocharged Ferrari

1984-1985
Car engine specification and weight remained unchanged. The fuel usage was set at 220 liters.

1986
Car engine specification and weight remained unchanged. The fuel usage was decreased to 195 liters. Atmospheric engines were banned.

1987
Turbo engines were set at 1500cc and turbo boost would be limited by pop-off valves set at four bar. The minimum car weight was 540kg and fuel tank capacity was 195 liters. Cars without turbo boost were allowed to take part with a set of rules including a 3500cc engine and a minimum car weight of 500kg. The cars were not restricted to a certain fuel capacity but were not allowed to refuel during the race.

1988
A new edict came out to curb turbo usage. Turbo engines were set at 1500cc turbo boost would be limited by pop-off valves set at 2.5 bar. The minimum car weight was 540kg and fuel tank capacity was 150 liters. Cars without turbo boost were allowed to take part with a set of rules including a 3500cc engine and a minimum car weight of 500kg. The cars were not restricted to a certain fuel capacity but were not allowed to refuel during the race.

1989 Ė 1993
Turbos breathed their last as the engines were banned. Atmospheric engines were allowed with a 3500cc engine and a minimum car weight of 500kg. The cars were not restricted to a certain fuel capacity but were not allowed to refuel during the race.

1994
Turbos were still banned. Cars were allowed to use atmospheric engines with a 3500cc engine and a minimum car weight of 505kg. After the Canadian Grand Prix it was increased to 520kg. The cars were not restricted to a certain fuel capacity but were not allowed to refuel during the race.

1995-1996
Turbo engines were still banned. Cars were allowed to use atmospheric engines with a 3000cc engine and a minimum car weight of 595kg including the driverís weight. Fuel usage was not set and cars were allowed to refuel during the race. However the electronic aid for the driver was banned.

1997-2002
The ban on the turbo engines continued. Cars were allowed to use atmospheric engines with a 3000cc engine and a minimum car weight of 600kg including the driverís weight. Fuel usage was not set and cars were allowed to refuel during the race. However the electronic aid for the driver was banned.


Australia 2005: Giancarlo Fisichella wins in Renault

2004
Constructors were forced to use one engine during the three day Grand Prix that includes the practice, qualifying and the race. Any engine change or repair would constitute the driver of dropping ten places on the grid based on his qualifying result.

2005
The engine rule was modified. Constructors will use one engine for two Grands Prix. Any engine change or repair would constitute the driver of dropping ten places on the grid based on his qualifying result.

Press release
Bahrain International Circuit

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