[htmfiles/menu_F1_left.htm]

The History of F1 Auto Racing
Part IV: The Constructors
March 11, 2005

The history of the Formula One Constructors’ Championship has been a constant battle between the teams that are vying for the title or the FIA changing the scoring system.

The constructors’ championship was brought to life in 1958, eight years after the Formula One Grand Prix formation. The scoring system of the constructors championship followed the same pattern of the drivers championship. It started with the top six cars scoring points and then the top eight were included in the tally.

In 2003, the FIA buffed the regulations of the World Championship’s scoring system. The winner gets ten points, followed by eight points for the runner-up, six points for third place and five points for the fourth place holder. Fifth place is good for four points, three points for sixth, two points for seventh and a single point for eighth.

The major difference between the scoring system of the constructors' championship and the drivers' is that the constructors' can have two cars in the top eight and receive points for both cars.

During the 1950’s and 1960’s, some constructors would enter more than two cars in the Grand Prix. Ferrari, for instance, clinched the top four spots in the 1961 Belgium Grand Prix. Ferrari today is the proud holder of 14 constructors’ world championship. It won the title in 1961, 1964, 1975, 1976, 1979, 1982, 1983, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003 and 2004.

The Williams team follows with nine titles clinched in 1980, 1981, 1986, 1987, 1993, 1994, 1996 and 1997. McLaren follows closely behind with eight titles won in 1974, 1984, 1985, 1988, 1989, 1992, 1992 and 1998. A team that has disappeared since 1993 – Lotus – won seven titles in 1963, 1965, 1968, 1970, 1972, 1973 and 1978.

Constructors that won the title twice are Cooper in 1959 and 1960 and Brabham in 1966 and 1967. One time winners include Vanwall in 1958, BRM in 1962, Matra in 1969, Tyrrell in 1971 and Benetton in 1995.

Usually the same team would win the drivers and the constructors’ titles. However, though a rarity, a different team would win the drivers and another would clinch the constructors’ championship.

In 1958, Vanwall won the constructors title while Mike Hawthorn clinched the driver's championship driving a Ferrari. In 1973, Lotus won the constructors while Scotsman Jackie Stewart in a Tyrrell took the drivers’ title. Briton James Hunt in a McLaren won the title in 1976 while Ferrari took the constructors crown.

Brazilian Nelson Piquet won his first title in 1981 in a Brabham while Williams took the constructors’ title. In 1982 and 1983, Ferrari strongly came back to win the title while Piquet with Brabham and Keke Rosberg with Williams won the drivers title respectively. In 1999, Ferrari again won the constructors title while Finn Mika Hakkinen took the driver's top honor, driving a McLaren.

Scoring system

1950-1959
First place: 8 points
Second place: 6 points
Third place: 4 points
Fourth place: 3 points
Fifth place: 2 points

One point for the fastest lap during the Grand Prix.

Until 1957, two drivers can drive the same car in rotation but have to split the points between them.

1960
First place: 8 points
Second place: 6 points
Third place: 4 points
Fourth place: 3 points
Fifth place: 2 points
Sixth place: 1 point

1961-1990
First place: 9 points
Second place: 6 points
Third place: 4 points
Fourth place: 3 points
Fifth place: 2 points
Sixth place: 1 point

1991-2002
First place: 10 points
Second place: 6 points
Third place: 4 points
Fourth place: 3 points
Fifth place: 2 points
Sixth place: 1 point

2003 – until now
First place: 10 points
Second place: 8 points
Third place: 6 points
Fourth place: 5 points
Fifth place: 4 points
Sixth place: 3 point
Seventh place: 2 points
Eighth place: 1 point

Press release
Bahrain International Circuit

Feedback can be sent to feedback@autoracing1.com

Go to our forums to discuss this article

[htmfiles/menu_F1_right.htm]


Copyright 1999-2012  AutoRacing1 is an independent internet online publication and is not affiliated with, sponsored by, or endorsed by the IRL., NASCAR, FIA,  Sprint, or any other series sponsor. This material may not be published, broadcast, or redistributed without permission.