Only in NASCAR do competitors collaborate

UPDATE #2 NASCAR's Robin Pemberton says no changes planned for radio rules for Talladega April 17th. Mike Mulhern [Editor's Note: Only in NASCAR. Maybe next year the Green Bay Packers and Pittsburgh Steelers can have radio communication into the other team's huddles during the NFL Super Bowl and collaborate on each play. Is NASCAR a sport or a circus?]

03/06/11 Drivers were able to communicate with non-teammates for the first time during the Daytona 500, which added an intriguing element to NASCAR's biggest race. Because there was a need for two-car tandems to work together while the race was going on, many drivers set their radios up so they could speak with their competitors. But some drivers believe the practice should be banned. "I think NASCAR should step in on drivers getting on other teams' radios," Kurt Busch said. "… We shouldn't be able to communicate with radios." Mark Martin had only four drivers among his options for chatting: His three teammates and AJ Allmendinger. But the veteran agreed with Busch, saying he hopes his competitors "clean the radios up." Paul Menard said he had 12 different drivers on his radio during the Daytona 500 – and was just fine with continuing the practice for future restrictor-plate races if NASCAR doesn't pass a rule against it. Carl Edwards backed the open radio communication between drivers based on safety reasons, calling it "necessary." SB Nation

02/26/11 Drivers were able to communicate with non-teammates for the first time during the Daytona 500, which added an intriguing element to NASCAR's biggest race. Because there was a need for two-car tandems to work together while the race was going on, many drivers set their radios up so they could speak with their competitors. But some drivers believe the practice should be banned.

"I think NASCAR should step in on drivers getting on other teams' radios," Kurt Busch said. "… We shouldn't be able to communicate with radios." Mark Martin had only four drivers among his options for chatting: His three teammates and AJ Allmendinger. But the veteran agreed with Busch, saying he hopes his competitors "clean the radios up." Paul Menard said he had 12 different drivers on his radio during the Daytona 500 – and was just fine with continuing the practice for future restrictor-plate races if NASCAR doesn't pass a rule against it. Carl Edwards backed the open radio communication between drivers based on safety reasons, calling it "necessary." SB Nation

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